Bulletin 5.30.21

Rom 8:28 "And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose."

A Reflection Before the Service

  • Author and Soviet Union prison camp survivor Alexander Solzhenitsyn died on August 3, 2008, at age 89. On June 8, 1978, while addressing the 1978 graduating class of Harvard University:

    “Harvard's motto is "Veritas," [Latin for truth]. Many of you have already found out, and others will find out in the course of their lives, that truth eludes us if we do not concentrate with total attention on its pursuit. And even while it eludes us, the illusion still lingers of knowing it and leads to many misunderstandings. Also, truth is seldom pleasant; it is almost invariably bitter.”

     

     

    ...in a world of violence it would not be worthy of God not to wield the sword; if God were not angry at injustice and deception and did not make the final end to violence God would not be worthy of our worship.... My Thesis that the practice of nonviolence requires a belief in divine vengeance will be unpopular with many Christians, especially theologians in the West. To the person inclined to dismiss it, I suggest imagining that you are delivering a lecture in a war zone...Among your listeners are people whose cities and villages have been first plundered, then burned and leveled to the ground, whose daughters and sisters have been raped, whose fathers and brothers have had their throats slit. The topic of the lecture: a Christian attitude toward violence. The thesis: we should not retaliate since God is perfect non-coercive love. Soon you would discover that it takes the quiet of a suburban home for the birth of the thesis that human nonviolence corresponds to God's refusal to judge. In a scorched land, soaked in the blood of the innocent, it will invariably die. And as one watches it die, one will do well to reflect about many other pleasant captivities of the liberal mind.

     

    -Miroslav Volf, (Croatian émigré and professor of theology at

    Yale University Divinity School) Exclusion and Embrace: A Theological

    Exploration of Identity, Otherness, and Reconciliation (1996)

     

The Call To Worship

  • Romans 8.28-32; 11.36

     

    And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose. For whom He foreknew, He also predestined to become conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the first-born among many brethren; and whom He predestined, these He also called; and whom He called, these He also justified; and whom He justified, these He also glorified. What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who is against us? He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how will He not also with Him freely give us all things?

     

    For from Him and through Him and to Him are all things. To Him be the glory forever. Amen.

     

    (Prayer)

     

  • Author and Soviet Union prison camp survivor Alexander Solzhenitsyn died on August 3, 2008, at age 89. On June 8, 1978, while addressing the 1978 graduating class of Harvard University:

    “Harvard's motto is "Veritas," [Latin for truth]. Many of you have already found out, and others will find out in the course of their lives, that truth eludes us if we do not concentrate with total attention on its pursuit. And even while it eludes us, the illusion still lingers of knowing it and leads to many misunderstandings. Also, truth is seldom pleasant; it is almost invariably bitter.”

     

     

    ...in a world of violence it would not be worthy of God not to wield the sword; if God were not angry at injustice and deception and did not make the final end to violence God would not be worthy of our worship.... My Thesis that the practice of nonviolence requires a belief in divine vengeance will be unpopular with many Christians, especially theologians in the West. To the person inclined to dismiss it, I suggest imagining that you are delivering a lecture in a war zone...Among your listeners are people whose cities and villages have been first plundered, then burned and leveled to the ground, whose daughters and sisters have been raped, whose fathers and brothers have had their throats slit. The topic of the lecture: a Christian attitude toward violence. The thesis: we should not retaliate since God is perfect non-coercive love. Soon you would discover that it takes the quiet of a suburban home for the birth of the thesis that human nonviolence corresponds to God's refusal to judge. In a scorched land, soaked in the blood of the innocent, it will invariably die. And as one watches it die, one will do well to reflect about many other pleasant captivities of the liberal mind.

     

    -Miroslav Volf, (Croatian émigré and professor of theology at

    Yale University Divinity School) Exclusion and Embrace: A Theological

    Exploration of Identity, Otherness, and Reconciliation (1996)

     

  • Romans 8.28-32; 11.36

     

    And we know that God causes all things to work together for good to those who love God, to those who are called according to His purpose. For whom He foreknew, He also predestined to become conformed to the image of His Son, that He might be the first-born among many brethren; and whom He predestined, these He also called; and whom He called, these He also justified; and whom He justified, these He also glorified. What then shall we say to these things? If God is for us, who is against us? He who did not spare His own Son, but delivered Him up for us all, how will He not also with Him freely give us all things?

     

    For from Him and through Him and to Him are all things. To Him be the glory forever. Amen.

     

    (Prayer)

     

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